Third and final day at the 1st International Veins Meeting - Morning review

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Third and final day at the 1st International Veins Meeting - Morning review
The third and final day at the College of Phlebology 1st International Veins Meeting started with a full crowd in the Science, Practical and Aesthetics Lecture Theatre.
 
Consultant Vascular Surgeon, Gabriele Bertoni, chaired the first session with the focus being on facial, thread and reticular veins.
 
The session included two presentations from Professor Mark Whiteley who looked at the phlebectomy technique for the treatment of bulging facial veins and temple veins and then the different substances injected for thread veins.
 
 
Vicki Smith of Absolute Aesthetics discussed the different methods of treatment for facial thread veins and performed a live demonstration to show how quick and effective Electro Surgery can be when removing them. Electro Surgery uses short wave diathermy and is an office treatment that requires no anaesthetic.
 
In the busy Leg Ulcer Charity room, speakers gave a two way perspective on the clinical and social side when caring for patients with leg ulcers.
 
 
Nurse Clare Mechen shared her personal experience of the challenges and positives when setting up her Leg Club ‘best foot forward’ based on the Lindsay Leg Club Foundation model. The foundation was created to assist and educate those suffering with leg ulcers and takes a holistic approach to treatment and care.
 
Clare highlighted the positive impacts the club was having on both patients and resources at her GP practice in Dorset.
 
 
 
David Foster, Vice Chairman of the Lindsay Leg Club foundation chaired the session and was joined by founder Ellie Lindsay who started the morning with a discussion on a social and medical approach to lower limb care.
 
The session ended with Stephan Becker giving a clinical view of using Platelet Rich Plasma therapy (PRP) for the wound care treatment of leg ulcers.
 
Attendees felt it has been a very positive session that was interesting to see the clinical and social aspect of leg ulcer care coming together.

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